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Measuring Guide: Kilts

A Thorough & Comprehensive Measuring Guide to Help You Achieve The Perfect Kilt

A great and accurate measure is critical to a well fitting kilt, tailored to last a lifetime.
Follow our step by step measuring guide to ensure your measurements are accurate when submitting with your kilt order.

Step One : Identifying You Body Shape

It's important to identify your body shape to measure correctly - different shapes require slightly different measuring techniques, keep this in mind.
The following diagram illustrates three basic shapes: Slim, Athletic/Average, Fuller.

Slim - Athletic/Average - Fuller
If you feel you are somewhere in between, it's worth watching a couple of the video provided that best relate to you.


Step Two : Preparing to Measure

You have identified your body shape, now it's time to prepare to measure.
Measuring for a kilt isn't the same as measuring for trousers!
You will need a measuring tape, ideally in inches.
We are looking for the following, keep this in mind throughout the following steps:

-Take everything our of your pockets and remove bulky jumpers
- Measuring wearing shorts may make finding the length easier, don't look down!
- Stand up nice and straight with your feet close together
- It's beneficial to find someone to help you

& Here's the points on the body that we will be looking for:
- Natural Waist Measurement: this doesn't refer to where the wait of your trousers sits, but instead where your natural waist is. Slim, athletic and average figures may find it useful to identify the belly button as a guide (although the belly button can vary from person to person) and use this mark as a guide to measure around. Feel down your sides for the top of the pelvis and run the tape measure in this dip above this prominent bone.
- Hip/Seat: This refers to your widest point. On athletic figures this may be as low as the thighs, on most though it is around the hips and bum.
- Length: From the natural waist previously found, measure down the front of the thigh to the middle of the knee cap

Now, we know our body shape, we know what points on the body we require measurements for - let's now watch the videos the apply to us for further guidance on how to get the perfect measure.


Step Three : The Measuring

Slim Figures

Slim figures refers to those who are straight up and down with little belly or bum.
Those of this frame are likely to require an 8 yard kilt.
Watch this video to get to grips with the ins and outs of measuring for a slim frame:

Hints & Tips -
- Natural Waist:
Feel down the sides of the body and find the top of the pelvis bone, measure with a tape around the body just above this bone (not around the bone or under the ribs) - Finding the belly button may help you. This is a body measure, not too loose, not too tight, just what is there.

- Hip/Seat:
Find the widest point in your seat region, likely around the bum, and measure around here fairly firmly - on slim frames theres little belly for the kilt to hold on to, so it's going to grasp the hips to stay hip! Measure your hip/seat and keep in mind for the aprons of the kilt to lie beautifully flat, there must be a minimum of a 5" difference between the waist and hip measurement (the hip/seat being the larger and don't be alarmed if your difference is over 10").

- Length:
Re-find and check again the natural waist measure and position at this stage. From this point, measure down the front of your thigh to the middle of the knee - don't look down! Further guidelines on length to follow.

Average and Athletic Figures

Athletic and average sized figures follow similar methods. This refers to those with a bit of shape in the belly, the bum and sometimes the thighs too.
Athletic frames may find that their widest point when considering the hip/seat measure is actually as low down as the thighs (think Chris Hoy or a rugby player to be extreme). Your belly may protrude a wee bit, and we take all of this into account to ensure your kilt hangs perfectly.
These frames are likely to require an 8 or a 9 yard kilt - 9 yards being required if your hip/seat measure is over 45"
Watch this video to get to grips with measuring for athletic and average figures.

Hints & tips -
- Natural Waist:
Feel down your sides until you feel the top of your pelvis bone and measure around where your finger dips in against the body at this point (not around the bone or under the ribs). Pointing out your belly button may help you too. Take a firm measure, making sure the tape is pulled tight enough to touch the small of the back - this is very important.

- Hip/Seat:
Determining the widest point is trickier for this body shape - it may be the bum or the thighs. Measure around the widest point quite loosely, pulling the tape out to come in line with a protruding belly - this will ensure the aprons of our kilt fall perfectly flat down in front of you from the natural waist. There must be a minimum of a 5" difference between the waist and hip measurement (the hip/seat being the larger and don't be alarmed if your difference is over 10").

- Length:
Re-find and check again the natural waist measure and position at this stage. From this point, measure down the front of your thigh to the middle of the knee - don't look down! Further guidelines on length to follow.

- Fell:
This refers to the sewn area of the pleats and on very athletic frames with a very large difference between waist and hip, it may be worth letting us know the measurement from the natural waist, down the bum to the widest point. Get in touch for more details on this if you feel you have a shapely bum and this would benefit you.

Fuller Frames

Fuller frames refer to those with more of a belly and a bum. This frame is likely to require an 8 or 9 yard kilt to ensure the best possible fit and longevity - 9 yards being required where the hip/seat measurement is over 45".
Watch this video to get to grips with measuring for fuller frames.

Hints & Tips -
- Natural Waist:
Run your fingers down your sides firmly until you reach the pelvis bone - measure around here where your fingers dip into your body, not around the bone itself or under the ribs. This is a very firm measurement on fuller frames, you must pull the tape pretty tightly to ensure the kilt is tight enough to stay up perfectly, the tape hitting the small of your back (your waist will do all of the work, and to ensure the kilt is shaped perfectly into the small of your back).

- Hip/Seat:
This is a loose measurement on looser frames. Find your widest point, likely around the bum and hip and measure around here, pulling the tape out in front of you until it is inline with any protruding belly - this will allow the aprons of the kilt to fall down perfectly flat from your natural waist. There must be a minimum of a 5" difference between the waist and hip measurement (the hip/seat being the larger and don't be alarmed if your difference is over 10"). If this measure if over 45", you will require a 9 yard kilt to ensure a great fit and longevity of the garment too.

- Length:
Re-find and check again the natural waist measure and position at this stage. From this point, measure down the front of your thigh to the middle of the knee - don't look down! Further guidelines on length to follow.


Step Four: Double Check

Everybody is different and don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions on measuring or would rather make an appointment in store instead. Our team double check all measurements before work commences and if they are any questions over what you have submitted they will be in touch to chat them over.

There are a few standards we can use to help guide us in regards to the length although you may find you have a longer legs and a short body - still worth keeping in mind:

Take your time when measuring and read through this information carefully. Feel free to give us a shout via email, phone or live chat during opening hours if you need further assistance.

Once you have your measurements your ready to start choosing your cloth and ordering your handmade kilt!